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's busiest commuter rail line. jonathan martin joins us from the crash site. and jonathan, i believe we are standing by to get an update on the investigation soon >> reporter: that's right, tony. we are expecting a news conference in the ntsb at 4:00 o'clock. so any minute, we will learn something. hopefully, as you mentioned, the investigators do have those two black boxes, the black box data recorders. one from the front of the train. one from the back. that hopefully will allow them to learn some information about what caused this deadly crash. tony, the big questions really out there at this point are: you know, was this caused by a mechanical error, operator error or possibly something else? maybe something with the tracks. now, the train's conductor who was injured, himself, in this derailment has said that there was an issue, possibly with the braking system. but these recorders are really significant because they can tell investigators down to the second what was going on with the air pressure in the braking system. so they will be able to tell to the one-second intervals whethe
of the busiest train lines. jonathan, good afternoon. how are the cleanup efforts going right now? >> well, stephanie, i would say crews are on the final stretches of work, at least here on the scene they brought on a out a cadaver dog. they uprighted most of the cars at this point. this is the final car. if you can see through the bushes here you'll see that final car there. they were just able to upright with these large cranes that they've been using and they've been hauling the other cars away. in fact the one you've been looking at, the earlier video, this is the car that was just inches from the water, where near where the hudson and harl rivers meet. that fourth person found inside the car. they were able to upright the cars. there were seven of them total and 150 people aboard as we've been reporting when this train was en route to grand central station. crews have finished their work in terms of getting them upright and moving them away, still not clear when service will be restored. there's still lots of working to do and an investigation that could take another seven to ten days
>> hello and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz in new york. parliament calls for new elections. protestors say that's not enough. in ukraine, a symbolic gesture. as protestors topple a statute of a hero. >>> and early venezuelan elections, as that country struggles. tonight the crisis deepens in thailand. the prime minister suddenly dissolves parliament and is calling for new elections. picture of thousands rallying in the capitol where it is 11:00 in the morning. opposition party resigns from conflict. and the conflict is not over yet. wayne hay has the latest. >>> there is no indication that the prime minister will dissolve parliament, that they will change their goals. those goals have in fact changed a bit over the past few weeks. at first they said they would accept house dissolution. that quickly changed into their goal being the removal of the regime, referring to the former prime minister who was ousted in 2006 and lives in self proclaimed compile. his sister is now prime minister. they say the government is corrupt, this current government is corrupt and only
for sure why it de-railed. let's take you to jonathan martin. he is at the crash site in the bronx. jonathan? >> reporter: hey, tony. you know, investigators have said from the start that this is a very preliminary information, but as you mentioned, these two black box data recorders have revealed key information. one frust from the front and one from the back, showing this train was going too fast echoing what a lot of these passengers and witnesses have been saying from the start. >> reporter: investigators with the national transportation safety board say they now know the commuter train that de-railed was going too fast as it approached a curve. >> the preliminary information and let me emphasize this is preliminary information from the event recorders shows that the train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30-mile-an-hour curve. >> investigators say it's too early to know if speeding was caused by operator or mechanical error like an issue with the brakes. >> we don't know whether the brakes went to zero pressure because of a valve change or be
... >>> hello, welcome to al jazeera america. i am jonathan betz in new york. >> we are going fast and as it hit the curve, it was flying. moments of panic on a new york train as investigators tried to figure out what went wrong. >>> anger growing in ukraine. the largest protest in that country in nearly a decade. >>> demands that thailand's prime minister must go violent in bangkok streets and calls for a national strike. >>> tonight, crews are working to clear the scene of a train crash in new york city that de-railed on its way to manhattan. at least four people are dead, 63 more hurt of those, at least 11 are in critical condition tonight. al jazeera kimberly dukehardt has the latest from the bronx. >> fire fighters, police and the ntsb could not working through the night, checking the tracks, the actual train cars, mechanical equipment, communication equipment, to try to figure out what went horrible wrong. the holiday weekend ended in tragedy and chaos for those on board this suburban commuter train in northern new york city. the crash happened early sunday morning. >> incide
>> this is al jazeera america, live from new york. i am jonathan betz. [ music ] >> a day of prayer and reflexion for nelson mandela. services are held in south africa and half a world away in the u.s. to honor his legacy. >> linennon comes krarning down >> peace keepers in the central contr control. >> massive problems in the midwest, a big winter storm pushes towards the east coast. [ music ] >> we begin tonight with a national day of prayer for the man called south africa's greatest son, nelson mandela was the topic in pulpits around the world today. services of all face honored the former president. a steady flow of more thurners candles and stood with others praying for the civil rights leader. there were scenes like this across sfrikdz today. more now from al jazeera nick schifrin. >> nelson mandela talked about a rainbo nation. his struggle wasn't on behalf of black south africans but on behalf of all segregated and humiliated by racist rulers. >> nelson mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. citizens of all races and religion say mandela created that had unity
>> this is al jazeera america live from new york. i'm jonathan betz with today's top stories. [ singing ] >> south africa begins its farewell to legendary freedom fighter nelson mandela with a day of prey and reflection. >> south korea expands its air defense zone raising tensions in asia >> and the heartland takes a hit from storms. today it's headed for the east coast [ ♪ music ] >> remembering nelson mandela. today was a day of national reflection. there was no bigger church or congregation than the people at the catholic church in south africa. [ singing ] >> the sounds of soweto, of a nation on what is not just another sunday. [ singing ] >> the congregation of the biggest catholic church in this largely christian country celebrates nelson mandela in song and prayer. similar services in all faiths are held across south africa in a day of reflection. >> we gather here to thank god for his life. we thank god for the blessing he bestowed on this world through the life of madiba. >> this church holds a special place in the history of antiapartheid movement. it was a sanct
>>> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz in new york. investigators ascertaining for what went wrong after a deadly train derailment in new york. the first in decades. >> we lost four new yorkers this morning. we have 11 critically injured who are still in the hospitals, and i would ask all new yorkers to remember them in your prayers tonight. >> ukraine has seen a large protest as the orange revolution nine years ago. >> and the leader of protests in thailand is calling for a national strike and tells the prime minister she must resign. >> tonight rescuers in new york city are uprighting toppled train cars, searching for more victims in the deadly train crash. the train derailed in the bronx on the way to manhattan. at least four are dead. there are 63 confirmed injuries. 11 are listed in critical condition. >> al jazeera's kilmeny duchardt is live at the scene. what is the latest on the investigation? >> tonight, on this very chilly night, firefighters, police, crews and the mtsb are combing through every part of the scene down there right now, looking at the tr
>> hello, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz in new york. merrill newman is back on u.s. soil. the korean war veteran has his long-awaited homecoming after being detained in north korea. >> cheers greet french troops in the central african republic. >> finally as a family we are humbled by the messages of condolence and support that we receive from government and people of the world. >> the family of nelson mandela makes its first statement since his death as the memorial grows for the antiapartheid leader. power outages and a travel nightmare. wintry weather spreads across the u.s. >> tonight a u.s. veteran is home with his family after being held in north korea for more than a month. merrill newman arrived in the 85-year-old was accused of committing crimes while he served in the korean war. his family called merrill newman's time in north korean's hands, "a very difficult ord eel", >> melissa chan has the story. >> when merrill newman made the trip, he would not have known how difficult it would turn out. after weeks of detention he's in the u.s., looking healthy, w
>> helicopter. welcome to al jazeera america. i am jonathan betz live in new york. >> protest orders in ukraine toppel a statute of a soviet hero. anger mounts to the government's push to go closer with russia. >>> peace keepers are on patrol as the president admits he's losing control in south america. >>> a day of prayer and reflexion for new mexico new mexico from south sfrikdz to half a world away. people honoring his legacyafricf a world away. people honoring his legacy. the same snowstorm that caused problems in the midwest is bringing dangerous weather to the northeast. we will begin at ukraine's capitol where protests reached a new level. the movement saw its biggest crowds yet. ukraine is bitterly divided over whether it should grow closer with europe or russia. it triggered deep anger now directed at soviet symbols. al jazeera tim friend has the latest from kiev. >> reporter: the protest went on into the night. ukrainian nationalists celebrated the top elling of kiev's statue of lenin shouting yanokovich, you are next. some ahave been camped out for two weeks. they
you. jonathan betz is here. jonathan. >> it is going to be a who's who of royals, celebrities, a leader of every major country will be in south africa, 100 have rscped so far. the queen of gland can't make it but david cameron can. mandela also close with cuba so its president, rool castro, -- raul castro will be there. hassan rouhani is coming. put not israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. he is concerned about the high security cost. >>> the dalai lama will be there. ful of johannesburg wip be shut down. an entire airport will be set aside for just the vips. security will be as tighter as it's ever pen. >> i'm sure the teams charged with the protection of the dignitaries are lee a liaising h the south african police. >> likely be the world's largest memorial service in decades. tony. >> all right, boy, that will be. and it's happening in just a few hours' time. jonathan, thank you. many towns are celebrating, the milestones that mandela achieved in south africa but as allen schauffler reports. >> it's also the heart of high end retail in johannesburg in one of the riche
. >> into welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm jonathan betz with the headlines. >> 1200 french reinforcements are on the ground in the central african republic. more are on the way. 400 have been killed there in fighting. an american veteran who spent 42 days detained is reunited with his family. fooum is 85. he was accused by officials of killing civilians. the official week of mourning forn nelson mandela has begun in south africa. a day of prayer and reflection will take place. across the country. today eegipion authorities released a group of 21 women. they were originally to spend 11 years behind bars. it caused outrage. the state department expressed concern over the new law requiring demonstrators to get government permission. >> i talk to a professor live from boston. do you think the united states is stern enough with egypt. >> we have little leverage. what we need to do is declare the values that the u.s. stands for, including freedom of speech, assembly, the right to due process but any influence would have to happen behind closed doors. it shouldn't be public, it should be through
was traveling 50 mph faster than it should have been when it derailed, and there is more. jonathan martin is on the scene. what's the latest? >> reporter: john, we know a piece of key information, you mentioned the speed. but what we don't know is was this a situation where it was operator error? where the conductor was operating this train too quickly, or was there a mechanical mistake? was there an issue with the braking system? an issue on the track? that's something that ntsb wants to know. but today speed may have caused is derailment, something reported early on by many witnesses and those people on board. investigators with the national transportation safety board say they now know that the commuter train that derailed was going too fast as it approached a curve. >> the preliminary information, and let me emphasize preliminary information from the event recorders shows that the train was traveling 82 mph. as it went into a 30 mph curve. >> reporter: invesinvestigatorsy it's too early to know if speeding was the cause or if it was mechanical error like brakes. >> we don't know if it
sectors. sow how many people can walk through in 30 minutes. jonathan bets has the question suching american students, and news anchors next on al jazeera america. >> this isn't a new channel, this is a watershed moment in media for america. >> this entire region is utterly devastated. >> people our here are struggling. >> the fire jumped the highway we took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period. >> start with one issue ad guests on all sides of the debate. and a host willing to ask the tough questions and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story next only on al jazeera america new test scores show american students just aren't making the grade. the study compares u.s. teens to piers in other countries. >> not a big surprise, but also not encouraging.
of the people until we restore our freedoms and jonathan. a lot of people out here remember that day. i am here with community activist, you were here in 1990, and it was a special day for you and rah lot of people. >> yes. it's -- i have warm great memories of that crowd. people are very very excited. and our dear brother moved throughout the community. with no poor of the community. and it is quite sad tonight. i am saddened and experience of his passing but i'm hoping that in his passing that our young people become inspired by his life work, and his commitment. to justice and equality and fair treatment of all people. and so that hopefully by the news running these stories and the articles that will appear in magazines that our young people embrace nelson mandela's history and his legacy. and that we can use some of that to empower our young people. that that they will become empowered. so symbolic hoping the same way they did during his visit in 1990. >> correct. we were with talking with mr. billy mitchell. it was special when he came to what are pledge of all places. that people were in
>> this is al jazeera america live from new york. i'm jonathan betz. the 6-week north korean odyssey is over for merrill newman, back home with hisno carrierringring with the white tilers. for merrill newman the war was ancient history. for north korea, ever ready to fight american imperialists. merrill newman was an enemy of the state. the two countries never signed a peace treaty, are techniy at war and as such his release likely required the personal approval of the country's leader kim jong un. why he let merrill newman go now remains a mystery. >> after merrill newman is home and has a rest, we'll have more to say about his unusual and difficult journey. for now, though, we ask you to allow us time to be with him as a family. we ask that you not forget another american, kenneth bae. >> he sentenced to prison. caught spreading the word of christianity - viewed as a greater threat than a soldier merrill newman. >> what is interesting about the situation is something revealing about releasing merrill newman. if you look at the two people, a soldier and missionary. after all
wrong and why. jonathan martin has the latest. >> reporter: the question remains now: was this caused by operator error or some sort of mechanical error on the brakes. we know from the ntsb, speed was a factor. >> that's something that was reported early on by passengers and witnesses. investigators with the national transportation safety board say they now know the commuter train was going too fast as it approached a curve. >> the preliminary information -- let me emphasize this is preliminary information -- from the event recorders shows that the train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30-mile-an-hour curve. >> investigate orders say it's too early to know if speeding was caused by operator or mechanical error, like an issue with the brakes. >> we don't know whether the brakes went to zero pressure because of a valve change or because of the train break-up. six seconds coming to a stop, the trolths had been at some power setting. >>> emergency cruise worked in the morning, using cadaver dogs and divers. all of the passengers and crew members have bee
to convict the quarterback. and jonathan martin is set to meet with the investigator for a second time regarding hazing accusations. martin left the team and is recently put on the noninjury list. >> still ahead, the u.s. security council approve as peace keeping force, to help end the violence in central africa republic. and how pittsburgh is transforming itself from steel city to tech city. using the day to to track possible regulars with nonterrorrists. pope front sis has formed an expert panel, one of the pan themes main duties will be to make the screening process for new priests much stricter. the prime minister of central africa republic is welcoming french military in the country. the decision was made just hours after chaos broke out. gun fights have spilled out into the streets of ban gi. it's president was ousted last march, today the u.n. security council approved the peace keeping force to end the violence, french president announced he would double the troops perhaps within hours. >> i have decided to react immediately. starting tonight, with the african forces and for th
education are in. for americans the numbers are going in the wrong direction. jonathan betz has the results. these tests show yet again american students are willing. the program for international student assessment tested students from around the world. asian countries were the top scores. the united states didn't crack the top 20. only 9% of american teens scored in the top two levels of maths, compared to shanghai where half the students who tested aced the exam. in maths 29 countries ranked better than america, including germany, u.k., france. but also countries like esownia, slovenia, chubb lick and latvia. for what it's worth, the u.s. outperformed students in mexico, jordan and indonesia. after 12 years of these tests the united states has not improved scores. the education secretary called it a picture of stagnation. >> the u.n. is marking today as international day for persons with disabilities. saying more than 1 billion people, 15% of the world's population live with a disability. the government estimates 19% of people have one, and many are children. some schools use technology
then the team picked itself. this time around the withdrawal of jonathan trott because of illness means a reshuffling of the england batting order with bell in line to take over the number three batting slot. >> from experience last time you let the cricket do the talking. last time we had the hostile environment. towards the end of the series we played good cricket. i thought everyone was respectful. we didn't do ourselves justice. coming back from 1-0 down is not easy. way back in 1954. england inspired to a 3-1 series win. andrew flintoff helped the home side win. having lost the first step. stuart broad bowled to victory. and alastair cook led the team to that 2-1 from behind win. australia's win in tests, one of the largest in terms of runs. the aussies are not expecting the tourists to fall quite so easily this time around. you see two good bowling attacks. we win is test match. if there two attacks, it's these two. there's enough in the wicket early. i think reverse swing will play a part, and i think spin will play a big part. >> the wicket may hold the ski. nathan lion should k
the ashes back in 2011. this time around the withdrawal of jonathan trump because of a stress-related illness means a reshuffling of the batting order. >> obviously from experience last time, you let your cricket do the talking. we had the same hostile environment last time we came here. and the hostility changes because everyone was very respectful of the way we played. last time we didn't do ourselves justice. >> reporter: 2005, andrew flintoff help his side win. four years later steward brood bolled england to victory to regain the ashes, and last yearalster cook lead his team to a win in india. australia's 381 run win in brisbane was the first in this large test. they aren't expecting the tourists to fall quite so easily this time around. >> you'll see two very good balling attacks. if there is any two attacks that will be able to find a way, it's these two. i think there will be enough in the wicket early, and spins will play a big part. >> reporter: the wicket may well hold the key to who wins in the match. this man was a curator here two years ago. >>> the miami heat's
could be surprising for many. jonathan betz has a closer look at what the president says is an economic inequality gap. >> simply put the poor are getting poorer and the rich are getting richer. first off, what does this mean? the median income for an american household was $53,000, down $yea from the year before and down $5,000 from 1999 when you adjust for inflation. but the economy is growing. however almost all of the money that's being made is going to the very rich. since 2009 the income of the top 1% grew by 31%. money is being made, but only for about a million and a half people here. yet for everyone else, 99% of the population, their salaries have barely moved in four years, less than 1%. the richest are taking home the most since the 1920s. why? some suggest years of tax cuts for the wealthy, the growth of the finance and technology companies, led to wall street fat cats and techies. computers and robots have taken a lot of the jobs since the 1970s. the minimum wage is $7.25 an hour. president obama has suggested to bump it up to about $10 an hour. one study suggests the mini
. >> in 1990, nelson mandela visited new york city. thousands gathered in harlem to hear him speak. jonathan martin is there to tell us about that and what the scene is like tonight. >> a lot of people remember it like it was yesterday, they remember the day in 1990 when the new york city mayor invited nelson mandela to the city. one of the first places he stopped was in harlem. there was a lot of anticipation, excitement, thousands of people came. earlier tonight the apollo theatre had a mark key lit up. the lights went out. it said, "in memory of nelson mandela we remember and love you." a lot of people remember when he came in 1990 it was a big part of the visit. it said welcome home mr and mrs nelson mandela. one of the people who remembered that was the historian, mr billy mitchell. we talked about what that day was like in his memory. >> he was fully aware that all the people from civil rights fighters and to have his preps here, it meant a lot to all of us coming up out of problems. we were going through housing, education, things that of nature. his presence made us feel good, that t
many of them raise their voices now, not on how many times the president does. let's go to jonathan martin, covering today's protest in new york. last year, 200 fast food workers held a one day strike at more than 20 restaurants here. are we expecting something like that today. >> it really remains to be seen just how significant, how large this protest will be. this all started and it has grown from a year ago with just a few fast food workers walking out in new york. this restaurant is open for business, people going in and out. a year ago in august, there were 500 people who protested outside of this mcdonald's. not all of them were fast food workers. we could see that today. organizers say it has grown bigger, expanding to 100 cities, smaller cities, so they feel like their movement has certainly grown. this latest wave of protests or planned protests started yesterday here in new york and about five other cities with one particular group, moveon.org delivering petitions in some five cities. >> you can work full time here and not support yourself, much less a family. here we are
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24